The different cluster states of an Amazon EMR cluster are listed below: STARTING – The cluster provisions, starts, and configures EC2 instances. BOOTSTRAPPING – Bootstrap actions are being executed on the cluster. RUNNING – A step for the cluster is currently being run.

WAITING – The cluster is currently active, but has no steps to run. TERMINATING – The cluster is in the process of shutting down.

TERMINATED – The cluster was shut down without error. TERMINATED_WITH_ERRORS – The cluster was shut down with errors. Reference: https://aws.amazon.com/elasticmapreduce/faqs/

 

 

 

 

Question: 160

The AWS CloudHSM service defines a resource known as a high-availability (HA)

, which is a virtual partition that represents a group of partitions, typically distributed between several physical HSMs for high-availability.

A.proxy group

B.partition group

C.functional group

D.relational group

 

 

 

 

Answer: B

Explanation:

The AWS CloudHSM service defines a resource known as a high-availability (HA) partition group, which is a virtual partition that represents a group of partitions, typically distributed between several physical HSMs for high-availability.

Reference: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/cloudhsm/latest/userguide/configuring-ha.html

 

 

 

 

Question: 161

Is it possible to get a history of all EC2 API calls made on your account for security analysis and operational troubleshooting purposes?

A.Yes, by default, the history of your API calls is logged.

B.Yes, you should turn on the CloudTrail in the AWS console.

C.No, you can only get a history of VPC API calls.

D.No, you cannot store history of EC2 API calls on Amazon.

 

 

 

 

Answer: B

Explanation:

To get a history of all EC2 API calls (including VPC and EBS) made on your account, you simply

?turn on CloudTrail in the AWS Management Console. Reference: https://aws.amazon.com/ec2/faqs/

 

 

 

 

Question: 162

You have just set up your first Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) but it does not seem to be configured properly. You discover that before you start using ELB, you have to configure the listeners for your load balancer. Which protocols does ELB use to support the load balancing of applications?

A.HTTP and HTTPS

B.HTTP, HTTPS , TCP, SSL and SSH

C.HTTP, HTTPS , TCP, and SSL

D.HTTP, HTTPS , TCP, SSL and SFTP

 

 

 

 

Answer: C

Explanation:

Before you start using Elastic Load Balancing(ELB), you have to configure the listeners for your load balancer. A listener is a process that listens for connection requests. It is configured with a protocol and a port number for front-end (client to load balancer) and back-end (load balancer to back-end instance) connections.

Elastic Load Balancing supports the load balancing of applications using HTTP, HTTPS (secure HTTP), TCP, and SSL (secure TCP) protocols. The HTTPS uses the SSL protocol to establish secure connections over the HTTP layer. You can also use SSL protocol to establish secure connections over the TCP layer.

The acceptable ports for both HTTPS/SSL and HTTP/TCP connections are 25, 80, 443, 465, 587,

and 1024-65535.

Reference:

http://docs.aws.amazon.com/ElasticLoadBalancing/latest/DeveloperGuide/elb-listener-confi g.html

 

 

 

 

Question: 163

After setting up some EC2 instances you now need to set up a monitoring solution to keep track of these instances and to send you an email when the CPU hits a certain threshold. Which statement below best describes what thresholds you can set to trigger a CloudWatch Alarm?

A.Set a target value and choose whether the alarm will trigger when the value is greater than (>), greater than or equal to (>=), less than (<), or less than or equal to (<=) that value.

B.Thresholds need to be set in IAM not CloudWatch

C.Only default thresholds can be set you can’t choose your own thresholds.

D.Set a target value and choose whether the alarm will trigger when the value hits this threshold

 

 

 

 

Answer: A

Explanation:

Amazon CloudWatch is a monitoring service for AWS cloud resources and the applications you run on AWS. You can use Amazon CloudWatch to collect and track metrics, collect and monitor log files, and set alarms.

When you create an alarm, you first choose the Amazon CloudWatch metric you want it to monitor. Next, you choose the evaluation period (e.g., five minutes or one hour) and a statistical value to measure (e.g., Average or Maximum).

To set a threshold, set a target value and choose whether the alarm will trigger when the value is greater than (>), greater than or equal to (>=), less than (<), or less than or equal to (<=) that value.

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